Month: March 2019

The Circular Economy Team March 11, 2019

Within the framework of the EU funded-SwitchMed Programme, UNIDO has organised a match-making event for the benefit of professionals in the plastics sector in Tunisia. The event took place on 18-19 December 2018 at the Novotel Tunis hotel, and served as a forum for exchange between Tunisian and foreign organisations around the theme of the circular economy of plastic. Exchanges between national and international actors have generated knowledge transfers, and possibly technologies in the future.

The Circular Economy Team March 11, 2019

The circular economy has become, for many governments, institutions, companies, and environmental organizations, one of the main components of a plan to lower carbon emissions. In the circular economy, resources would be continually re-used, meaning that there would be no more mining activity or…

The Circular Economy Team March 10, 2019

US companies are increasingly making circular economy practices a norm in their business models, according to new research from ING.  Nearly four in five companies have a strategic intent to implement a circular economy framework (62%) or have already put one in place (16%), according to ING’s report. It’s based on a survey of 300 US-based executives in four key economic sectors: automotive, consumer electronics and telecoms, food and agriculture, and healthcare.

The Circular Economy Team March 10, 2019

UNRISE is coordinated by Prof. Huub de Groot from Leiden University (the Netherlands) and brings together a multidisciplinary consortium of 20 partners from 13 European countries. The SUNRISE consortium includes: seven universities (Leiden University, University of Uppsala, Imperial College of London, University of Turku, University of Warsaw, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and University of Louvain); eight research centres…

The Circular Economy Team March 10, 2019

In this video, Jean-Claude Lévy, an expert at the Institut National de l’Économie Circulaire, discusses implementation of circular economy dynamics within territories. He discusses several aspects such as law, territorial added value, semantics, or scientific research,…

The Circular Economy Team March 10, 2019

Washington State Legislators Sen. Kevin Ranker (D-Orcas Island) and Rep. Strom Peterson (D-Edmonds) recently held a press conference at the Seattle Aquarium, and were joined by the Surfrider Foundation and a coalition of advocates in support of the “Washington Reusable Bag Act” to announce they are introducing companion bills in January, 2019, at the state legislature to address plastic pollution and recycling contamination due to plastic bags. The reusable bag legislation will build off the existing 23 local ordinances already in place in the state of Washington.  The coalition organizations supporting this policy include: Environment Washington, Puget Soundkeeper, Seattle Aquarium, Surfrider Foundation and Zero Waste Washington.  Washington State Represenative Strom Peterson speaks at the Seattle Aquarium along with coalition partners. Photo credit Seattle Aquarium. Surfrider Foundation Washington chapters have been active leaders on this issue in Washington for many years. They have helped to pass plastic bag ordinances at the local level, most notably playing a lead role in the city of Bellingham, which served as a model for other communities. The chapters have also played a key role in the passage of a bag ban in the city of Tacoma.  The problem:  Plastic bags are problematic in the litter…

The Circular Economy Team March 10, 2019

Conceptual photographer Benjamin Von Wong has shared details about his latest project on his blog—an art installation made from 168,000 plastic straws called “The Parting of the Plastic Sea.” The idea behind the work is to draw attention to the “truckload of plastic flowing into the ocean every 60 seconds”—and to emphasize how a small step like forgoing a plastic straw when conducted on a large scale can make a big difference—stopping the “strawpocalypse,” as Von Wong puts it. Of course, Von Wong didn’t go out and buy the straws for the project—even if it would have only cost $10 for 100,000 of them. He took the harder route, working with Zero Waste Saigon, Starbucks Vietnam and hundreds of volunteers to gather used straws over the course of half a year. A local builder then helped to construct the frame that would support the “waves” of plastic. To generate maximum awareness, the installation was located at the Estella Place shopping mall in Ho Chi Minh City. On his blog, Von Wong says “The Parting of the Plastic Sea” isn’t only about straws. He writes: “It’s about taking a first step towards paying attention to the plastic epidemic threatening the…