Kingfisher spearheading the circular economy

Kingfisher spearheading the circular economy

Kingfisher has established a number of design principles (in collaboration with experts from Bioregional). ”These principles help our product developers and suppliers integrate circular design principles into our products and supply chains in a way that is good for customers and for our business”, Laurie says. Kingfisher’s principles focus on six so-called impact areas: safe materials for humans and nature, sustainable materials that are easily and widely recycled, reused or renewed, utility and function, including efficient use of materials and design for longevity and reuse, energy and carbon, focusing on reducing fossil fuel energy use, water stewardship and ethical responsibility, including fair and safe working conditions in the supply chain. Retail Detail had an exclusive interview with Caroline Laurie, Head of Sustainability of the Kingfisher group that has several large DIY-chains in its portfolio, operating around 1200 stores (store brands such as B&Q, Castorama or Brico Depot) and omnichannel operations in 10 European countries. According to Laurie, Kingfisher has been integrating circular economy principles into product design for many years, working with partners including Bioregional and the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. “We focus on solutions that reflect growing customer interest in smarter consumption, and product ranges or services that help customers and our business to get more from less, reuse or use longer. Most people have never heard of the circular economy but they know they want quality products that are long-lasting, create less waste and are easy to recycle.” 
Read the full article at: www.retaildetail.eu

How Circular is the Circular Economy?

How Circular is the Circular Economy?

The circular economy has become, for many governments, institutions, companies, and environmental organisations, one of the main components of a plan to lower carbon emissions. In the circular economy, resources would be continually re-used, meaning that there would be no more mining activity or waste production. The stress is on recycling, made possible by designing products so that they can easily be taken apart.
Attention is also paid to developing an “alternative consumer culture”. In the circular economy, we would no longer own products, but would loan them. For example, a customer could pay not for lighting devices but for light, while the company remains the owner of the lighting devices and pays the electricity bill. A product thus becomes a service, which is believed to encourage businesses to improve the lifespan and recyclability of their products.
The circular economy is presented as an alternative to the “linear economy” – a term that was coined by the proponents of circularity, and which refers to the fact that industrial societies turn valuable resources into waste. However, while there’s no doubt that the current industrial model is unsustainable, the question is how different to so-called circular economy would be.
Several scientific studies (see references) describe the concept as an “idealised vision”, a “mix of various ideas from different domains”, or a “vague idea based on pseudo-scientific concepts”. There’s three main points of criticism, which we discuss below.

Global Agencies Propose New Circular Electronics Economy

Global Agencies Propose New Circular Electronics Economy

UN agencies along with the World Economic Forum, the Global Environment Facility, and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development called for an overhaul of the current global electronics system this week in Davos, Switzerland. The world produces as much as 50 million metric tons of electronic and electrical waste annually — weighing more than all of the commercial airliners ever made, according to UN Environment. This waste is actually worth over $62.5 billion. Given that less than 20% of global e-waste is formally recycled, a new report from the Platform for Accelerating the Circular Economy (PACE) and the UN E-Waste Coalition proposes a circular e-waste economy. The report, A New Circular Vision for Electronics, Time for a Global Reboot, says it is time to reconsider e-waste, re-evaluate the electronics industry, and reboot the system for the benefit of industry, consumer, worker, health of humankind and the environment. “There is a lot of economic value in e-waste, particularly from such materials as gold, silver, copper, platinum and palladium, among others,” the report notes. In addition, it points out that there is 100 times more gold in a metric ton of smartphones than in a metric of gold ore. Last year, researchers discovered that extracting metals from e-waste costs 13 times less than mining ore. “The transition to a circular economy must take place in a way that benefits all stakeholders from the consumer to workers, government, businesses, entrepreneurs and society at large,” the report concludes. “There will be a need for mass collaboration, system changing ideas, new policy frameworks and new ways of doing business.” We are currently accepting submissions for the 2019 Environmental Leader Awards. Learn more and submit a project or product here. Design: Products designed for durability, reuse and safe recycling, substances of concern substituted out. Reintegration of manufacturing scrap: Scrap metal from manufacturing is re-introduced into new components.
Read the full article at: www.environmentalleader.com

SC Johnson and Ellen MacArthur Foundation partner to spur circular economy progress

SC Johnson and Ellen MacArthur Foundation partner to spur circular economy progress

Announced this week at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, the partnership will see the two organisations work together to bring innovative, cradle-to-cradle products and services to market. Specifically, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation will offer its best practice advice to SC Johnson and connect the company to its nine other Global Partner corporates, including Nike, Unilever, Google and H&M, while SC Johnson will invest in research, development and trials of new products and materials.
The overarching aim of the Foundation’s Global Partner scheme is to drive a culture-wide shift to a truly circular economy, in which no resources are sent to landfill or left to pollute nature. As the owner of brands such as Mr Muscle, Glade and Windex, SC Johnson’s specific focus will be on single-use plastic packaging – a topic it has been discussing with industry experts for “several years”, according to chairman and chief executive Fisk Johnson. “Plastic pollution is an enormous problem, and it is going to take businesses, governments, consumers and civil society working together to solve it,” Johnson said. “We’re all going to have to come together, and Ellen and the Foundation have done an excellent job creating an opportunity for partnership and progress.”
Read the full article at: www.edie.net

Recycling gets nod under ‘circular economy’ projects

Recycling gets nod under ‘circular economy’ projects

Support for a shift to a circular economy has been growing since the World Economic Forum (WEF) undertook a multi-year collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation under the Project Mainstream to accelerate a transition. Project Mainstream is a CEO-led initiative that helps to scale business innovations related to the circular economy. The idea behind the circular economy is to reuse and recycle resources multiple times to keep them in use for as long as possible and minimise waste. Building on the work of the WEF and the MacArthur Foundation, the Platform for Accelerating the Circular Economy – PACE- was launched in 2017 as a public-private collaboration. It is co-chaired by the CEO of Philips and the heads of the Global Environment Facility and UN Environment, along with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, the International Resource Panel, Circle Economy and Accenture Strategy as knowledge partners. The World Economic Forum hosts and facilitates the Platform. The Global Leadership Group currently includes over 40 CEOs, ministers and heads of international organisations committed to leading a portfolio of projects and activities. Project focus areas include plastics, electronics, food and bioeconomy, the business model, and market transformation across China, Asean, Europe and Africa. Following the trend across Asia, businesses are increasingly discarding the decades-old “take, make, waste” model in favour of the circular economy in which waste is minimised and products are kept in the market in one virtuous loop. The approach has the potential to spur a new industrial revolution, Eco-Business Magazine reported recently. For example, in Taiwan, used coffee grounds collected from Starbucks cafes are turned into T-shirts, socks and soaps by Taiwanese firm Singtex. Lighting giant Philips gives office landlords in Singapore free lights in return for a share of the energy saved. In the Philippines, discarded fishing nets are sold by local communities to carpet maker Interface to make fresh carpet tiles. All over the world, including in Asia, home-sharing platforms Airbnb and PandaBed, along with car-sharing services Lyft and Tripda, and goods-sharing apps SnapGoods and Rent Tycoon are fuelling collaborative consumption and changing the way people use goods. In Thailand, Magnolia Quality Development Corporation Ltd (MQDC) has collaboration with PTT Global Chemical Plc (GC) to develop upcycled building materials from plastic waste. The materials were used in the construction of MQDC’s residential projects starting last year. The first project features construction of a 5-kilometre network of footpaths that will take at least 160 tonnes of plastic waste. The plastic is being provided by GC, which collects it from the sea. Later, the company’s Research & Innovation for Sustainability Centre (RISC) will carry out research and development into the use of other such materials in infrastructure at its projects. The World Economic Forum estimates that 80 per cent of the US$3.2 trillion (Bt103 trillion) value of the global consumer goods sector is lost irrecoverably each year due to the current inefficient linear “make, take, waste” model.
Read the full article at: www.nationthailand.com

Can Makers produces sustainability report

Can Makers produces sustainability report

The attention on packaging’s environmental impact has markedly heightened in recent months, putting increasing pressure on governments, brands and retailers to act. Media coverage has been predominantly focused on the marine impact of single use plastics, including plastic bottles, and as a result this has put pressure on other drinks packaging formats too. It gets overlooked, surprisingly often, that there is already a ready-made solution for many drinks to switch to. It’s called the drinks can. The Can Makers says the drinks can is the perfect example of the circular economy already in action, pointing out that when an aluminium can reaches the end of its useful life, the material is never lost. It’s simply collected and recycled, over and over, with no loss of its inherent properties or quality, there’s no need to add virgin raw materials. Up to 75% of all aluminium ever produced is still in use today. The European Commission’s Circular Economy Package (CEP) sets common targets to increase recycling to prevent valuable resources from being lost in the recycling loop. It has set an overall packaging waste recycling target of 75% by 2030 and an aluminium packaging recycling target of 85% by 2030 to help drive the circular economy. The UK Government outlined new targets in 2017 for aluminium, challenging businesses to achieve 64% by 2020. Aluminium drinks cans already contribute significantly to this overall recycling target. 72% of all drinks cans were recycled in the UK in 2017.
Read the full article at: www.packagingnews.co.uk

Cosmoprof Bologna 2019 event designed around sustainability

Cosmoprof Bologna 2019 event designed around sustainability

The event organisers note that businesses are showing an increased commitment to becoming eco-sustainable both in terms of their business operations and their products, while consumers are becoming more aware of natural ingredients and eco-packaging. The Cosmoprof team says its initiatives for the show have embraced these trends, while also pledging its own commitment to make the actual event more sustainable and eco-friendly. Likewise, the show will also be platforming sustainability and eco-friendly initiatives by exhibitors on the show floor, with the aim of inspiring other businesses to stay ahead of everything that is helping to drive this important trend.
Read the full article at: www.cosmeticsdesign-europe.com

Circular economy: European Parlement back plans to boost recycling and cut landfilling

Circular economy: European Parlement back plans to boost recycling and cut landfilling

Statistics for 2014 suggest that 44% of all municipal waste in the EU is recycled or composted. This compares to just 31% in 2004, and by 2020 EU member states should be recycling or composting over 50% of waste. In 2014, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden sent virtually no municipal waste to landfill, whereas Cyprus, Croatia, Greece, Latvia and Malta still landfill more than three quarters of their municipal waste. Although waste management in the EU has improved considerably in recent decades, almost a third of municipal waste is still landfilled and less than half is recycled or composted, with wide variations between member states. Improving waste management could deliver benefits for the environment, climate, human health and the economy. As part of a shift in EU policy towards a circular economy, the European Commission made four legislative proposals introducing new waste-management targets regarding reuse, recycling and landfilling. The proposals also strengthen EU provisions on waste prevention and extended producer responsibility, and streamline definitions, reporting obligations and calculation methods for targets.
Read the full article at: www.duurzaam-ondernemen.nl

HISER project final conference: new circular economy solutions for the construction sector

HISER project final conference: new circular economy solutions for the construction sector

The final conference of the project is organised during EU Raw Materials Week 2018 in Brussels in La Plaza Hotel, on 16th of November 2018. Agnieszka Kowalska, an Expert of ASM – Market Research and Analysis Center (project consortium member responsible among others for HISER dissemination) informed us that after nearly four years of collaboration in the project, the aim of this final event is to present HISER findings in an attractive way to contribute to the dissemination of the knowledge and experience gathered throughout the project – Covered topics will include among others innovative demolition methods and tools  –  Mrs. Kowalska adds – together with technological solutions for closing material loops. HISER will increase the use of recovered raw materials. This will be achieved by the development of new building products through the partial replacement of virgin raw materials by higher amounts of secondary high-purity raw materials recovered from complex C&DW. Cost-effectiveness is also guaranteed by using novel harmonized methodological solutions and tools. Moreover, the project promotes advanced technical methods as well as technologies for the production of high-purity raw materials from complex C&DW. Some really unique solutions have been proposed, like harmonized procedures complemented with an smart tool (BIM) and a supply chain tracking system, for highly-efficient sorting at source in demolition and refurbishment works. These solutions have been demonstrated in demolition projects and five case studies across Europe. Moreover, the economic and environmental impact of the HISER solutions has been quantified, from a life cycle perspective. Market analysis and policy and standard recommendations encouraging the implementation of the best solutions have been drafted.
Read the full article at: www.hiserproject.eu

Circle Economy Launches Circle Lab to Crowdsource Circular Solutions for Humanity’s Biggest Challenge

Circle Economy Launches Circle Lab to Crowdsource Circular Solutions for Humanity’s Biggest Challenge

The circular economy is a concept that provides new business strategies and economic policies to create value again and again and aims to achieve inclusive economic, social and environmental prosperity within the planet’s boundaries. The launch of Circle Lab follows the news that the global economy is only 9.1% circular and that the current linear system of production is failing people and the planet. “eBay has been at the heart of the circular economy since its founding over 20 years ago. The eBay Foundation believes that by using the power of technology to bring people together, the circular economy can help fuel the future of commerce. We are proud to support Circle Lab, a platform that accelerates creative problem-solving and entrepreneurial action towards a more circular economy,” said Amy Millington, President of eBay Foundation. During the past five years, Circle Economy has worked on hundreds of business cases, and supported businesses, cities and regions in imagining a new “circular future”. After bringing to life countless pilot projects, they have identified the need for a platform that not only captures ideas and encourages collaboration, but also ensures that those ideas see the light of day and are actually implemented. During a successful market validation phase last year, Circle Lab brought together a community of nearly 14,000 and co-created unique reverse logistics solutions for the mobile phone industry. Following this phase, Circle Economy launched the open-access knowledge portion of Circle Lab in August of 2017. The knowledge hub has since brought together nearly 2,000 circular economy enthusiasts who are now using the hub’s 750 case studies to share and further learn about the topic. “The launch of the knowledge hub and results of the market validation showed us that there is a high demand for a global community to engage and co-create circular solutions. The addition of a challenge environment is the next step,” said Friedl.
Read the full article at: www.duurzaam-ondernemen.nl

Lehigh win Circular Economy award in Davos

Lehigh win Circular Economy award in Davos

Lehigh Technologies has won the Young Global Leaders Award for Circular Economy SME (small to medium-sized enterprise) for The Circulars 2019, the 5th iteration of the award, in Davos at the World Economic Forum on 21 January 2019. Lehigh was recognized for upcycling end-of-life tyre materials into Micronized Rubber Powder (MRP), a sustainable, lower-cost, high performing and customizable feedstock for industrial and consumer markets. MRP is used as an additive in a wide range of consumer and industrial products, like tyres. By improving performance and cost, Lehigh’s business model is said to be closing the loop on tyre production, ensuring sustainability and stability in manufacturing costs for the tyre industry and reducing dependence on oil-based chemicals. According to the company, tyres made with Lehigh’s MRP have better vehicle fuel economy compared to tyres made of less technological rubber powder and have saved a total of over 20 million passenger car tyre equivalents from landfills in more than 10 years. To date, Lehigh’s products have been used to manufacture over 500 million tyres using a circular model. “Consumers, employees, stakeholders and policymakers alike expect companies to lead with purpose around sustainability and are holding them accountable. Inaction or idleness can severely harm competitiveness, with a drop in stakeholder trust costing businesses globally $180 billion in potential revenues,” said Peter Lacy, Senior managing director, Accenture Strategy. “Moving to a circular economy delivers the disruptive change needed to secure a sustainable future, while enabling businesses to unlock innovation and growth. We are proud to recognize the individuals and organizations that are leading the circular movement, creating a thriving global economy.”
Read the full article at: www.tyrepress.com

EuPC & Partners Publish Strategic Research Plastics in a…

EuPC & Partners Publish Strategic Research Plastics in a…

Plastics can accelerate their contribution to the European Circular Economy objectives of reduced greenhouse gas emissions, higher resource effciency and job creation, according to a new report from EuPC and 4 other partners. ‘Plastics Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda in a Circular Economy’ was developed in cooperation with SusChem, the European Technology Platform for Sustainable Chemistry; CEFIC, the European Chemical Industry Council; PlasticsEurope; and ECP4, the European Composites, Plastics and Polymer Processing Platform. The report presents a shared vision, demonstrates how collaboration within the plastic value chain will be a driving force for change, and outlines the future research needs required to fulfil the objectives of the European Plastic Strategy. The technology solutions described are part of an integral approach to make the entire plastics production more circular. To achieve an overall increased circularity, the report identified a number of key factors: Design materials with enhanced separation and recycling properties, Design articles/products to encourage reuse, Develop repair solutions that extend the lifetime of plastic articles, Innovate advanced recycling technologies to increase the value retrieved from plastic waste, Incorporate alternative feedstocks in the production of plastics – feedstocks that take waste or by-products from other sectors and processes, such as biological feedstock from the agricultural industry, carbon-based feedstock from the chemical industry and chemical and secondary plastics from the plastic industry.
Read the full article at: waste-management-world.com

New Case Study Report on Messaging the Circular Economy

New Case Study Report on Messaging the Circular Economy

As more companies commit to innovative circular economy and sustainability strategies and investments, there is an increased need to learn the best practices for successfully communicating these decisions externally. The Chamber Foundation recently published a case study and insights publication, Messaging the Circular Economy, which showcases (1) tactics companies are taking to educate customers on their circular products, ambitions, or service offerings, and the opportunity the circular economy represents in the United States; (2) perspective pieces from nonprofit organizations, communications and advisory firms, academia, and trade associations on how to communicate to external stakeholders about circularity; and (3) research on what messages resonate with which audiences. The case study publication covers approaches from a wide range of businesses, from internationally headquartered to U.S.-headquartered, publicly traded to privately held, business-facing to consumer-facing, and across industries, from consumer electronics to apparel. Communicating business relevance, shared responsibility, and corporate priorities about extending the useful life of products and services involves many tactics, exemplified and explained in the publication. Within the report, you’ll see details of video campaigns, graphics, white papers, and playbooks, as well as the value in transparency regarding lessons learned and approach rationale. The publication fills the gap in the literature on how companies can most effectively communicate about their circular ambitions, products, and service offerings. Businesses that want to understand how best to communicate such priorities can reference the examples and research insights featured in the report.
Read the full article at: www.uschamberfoundation.org

What it Will Take to Create a Circular Economy

What it Will Take to Create a Circular Economy

As great as the circular economy sounds, getting there will require profound transformations in how we do business. It could start with how we design products, suggested Faith Legendre, a circular economy solutions strategist at Cisco. She suggested that more companies could put leaders in charge of designing for circularity, and that companies should have a plan for and be held responsible for what happens at the end of a product’s life. Planning for disposal needs to happen while the product is being conceived, she said, not tacked on afterwards. Achieving circularity will require a combination of both rules and incentives for companies, the panel participants agreed. Legendre suggested that innovation centers and technology incubators could include criteria that judge new product ideas based on what happens at the end of its lifetime. She’d also like to see circularity incorporated into financial ratings systems. But ultimately she thinks regulation will be needed as well. Until producers are held accountable for the full lifecycle of their products, she said, they will continue to make decisions that contribute to sending those products to the landfill. Anne van Riel, head of Sustainable Finance Americas at ING, said that consumers can also help drive change by choosing to buy more sustainable products and to invest their retirement funds in responsible companies. “I wouldn’t underestimate the power that consumers have,” she said.
Read the full article at: news.climate.columbia.edu

The world is round; the economy should be circular

The world is round; the economy should be circular

Entropy, life-cycle accounting and the circular economy are terms and concepts indicative of how society looks at the world differently than previous generations. As the global population pushes toward 10 billion by the end of this century, thoughtful approaches to sustainability will become ever more essential to policymakers. Yet a coherent narrative remains elusive. 
Industrialized countries continue to operate very far from a circular economy. Instead, they rely heavily on a linear economy, where the make-use-dispose product life cycle dominates. A circular economy, by contrast, encourages product reuse and longevity, not disposability and planned obsolescence. Efforts by communities and policymakers to develop circular economies and maintain the viability of natural ecosystems in the United States and other countries take many forms. Several cities around the U.S., including San Antonio, have made it a priority to implement policies aimed at long-term sustainability. For example, in August 2016, the city of San Antonio adopted its SA Tomorrow Sustainability Plan intended to prepare the city for smart, sustainable growth in light of the prospect of an additional million residents by 2040. The plan is a fuller elaboration of past efforts such as Mission Verde and SA2020. For 14 months, the city of San Antonio engaged a broad range of stakeholders in a variety of venues to solicit input and develop the plan. Focus areas include energy, food systems, green buildings, infrastructure, land use, transportation, natural resources, public health and solid waste resources. Cross-cutting themes include air quality, economic vitality, equity, resilience and water resources. On a global basis, some of the most systematic research dealing with sustainability comes from the Stockholm Resilience Centre, which examines planetary boundaries affected by our waste outputs and attempts to gauge those most at risk. The boundaries include stratospheric ozone depletion, which filters out ultraviolet radiation; loss of biosphere integrity, which is necessary for biodiversity; chemical pollution; climate change; ocean acidification; the freshwater cycle; land system change, when forests, grasslands wetlands, coastal fisheries, savannas and other habitats that recycle are converted to municipal, industrial or agricultural use; the nitrogen-phosphorous cycle, or fertilizer runoff; and atmospheric aerosol loading.
Read the full article at: mahb.stanford.edu

McCormick Becomes The Top Global Sustainable Food Corporation

McCormick Becomes The Top Global Sustainable Food Corporation

McCormick & Company’s dedication to sustainability and emphasis on what’s right for the long-term vitality of people, communities and the planet while delivering top-tier financial results, has earned the company a top spot in a recent ranking. McCormick’s, a global flavor and spice manufacturer, was named the 13th most sustainable corporation and No. 1 in the food products industry on the 2019 Global 100 Sustainability Index released at the World Economic Forum by Corporate Knights. The company advanced 10 spots from the 2018 rankings and retained the top position among its peers in food. The company says it continues to make progress on commitments to source their ingredients sustainably, improve the resilience, and map the contributions of small farmers, especially women, and reduce the company’s environmental impact by lowering its carbon footprint and reducing solid waste. Environmental Commitments Last year, McCormick made a public commitment to 100% plastic packaging that can be reused, recycled or repurposed by 2025. The company joined The New Plastics Economy Global Commitment, led by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. The commitment, signed by companies representing 20% of all plastic packaging produced globally, aims to create a circular economy for plastics, ultimately eliminating plastic pollution at the source. Also in 2018, the spice seller announced it will open its new global headquarters in Hunt Valley, Maryland, bringing 1,000 employees previously located across four different office buildings into one building that is designed to be LEED Gold certified.
Read the full article at: www.environmentalleader.com

Becoming Sustainable Montréal through action and leadership

Becoming Sustainable Montréal through action and leadership

The Ville de Montréal is making sustainability a reality. From electrifying transport to promoting urban agriculture, Montréal is enacting policies and initiatives that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help create a safe, resilient, inclusive and sustainable city. As host of the ICLEI World Congress 2018, Montréal’s initiative on climate and sustainability will be on display when local and regional leaders from around the world come together to show how they are advancing sustainable urban development worldwide. Through its Sustainable Montréal 2016-2020 plan, the city is taking on four key priorities: Reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on fossil fuel Strengthen biodiversity, increase green space, protect and ensure the efficient use of natural resources Plan on the human scale, ensuring access to healthy, sustainable neighborhoods Transition to a green, circular and responsible economy.
Read the full article at: talkofthecities.iclei.org

Here’s How C&A Made the “World’s Most Sustainable Jeans” –

Here’s How C&A Made the “World’s Most Sustainable Jeans” –

What goes with C&A’s “world’s most sustainable T-shirt”? The Belgium-based retailer’s “world’s most sustainable jeans,” of course. Like their upper-body counterpart, the jeans are the first retail offering to be certified on a Gold level by California’s non-profit Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute (C2CPII). The accomplishment was no small feat: To qualify for a C2C certification, products must undergo a slew of tests for human and environmental health, material reutilization, renewable energy use, carbon management, water stewardship and social justice. Ratings are based on five levels: Basic, Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum. Though G-Star Raw partnered with Saitex and DyStar to concoct, from 100 percent organic cotton, the first-ever C2C Certified Gold denim, C&A opted for something with a bit more stretch. It worked with Arvind Limited to employ biocompatible elastane from Roica by Asahi Kasei and approved dyes from DyStar, but some components, such as the fabric lining of the waistband, required a complete overhaul. While polyester knit or non-woven interlinings are popularly employed for their versatility and affordability, they also often contain antimony, a chemical that is verboten under C2C guidelines. (Blends, for the same reason, are also a non-option.) An exclusively cotton interlining, one that proved durable enough for denim, had to be fabricated instead.

Lebanon: EU helps implementing circular economy in wineries

Lebanon: EU helps implementing circular economy in wineries

In late November 2018, together with its local partners in Lebanon, SCP/RAC, The Regional Activity Centre for Sustainable Consumption and Production, has participated to The final capitalisation Seminar of the Pilot Project entitled “Wine Innovation for Sustainable Economies” in order to discuss its outcomes. The seminar has been preceded by a visit to the beneficiary of the project in the Beqaa valley namely Château Kefraya, to have more insights about the in situ composting process piloted on its premises. The seminar has witnessed the participation of many actors and has been an excellent opportunity to exchange ideas on the circular economy in Lebanon, beyond the winery sector.

Unilever and Veolia partner on sustainable packaging

Unilever and Veolia partner on sustainable packaging

Unilever is working toward a self-imposed goal to be, by 2025, using plastic packaging only if it is designed to be fully reusable, recyclable, or compostable. And since recyclables are only ever actually recycled if there’s a lucrative market for the resulting material, the multinational has also pledged to use 25% recycled material in its packaging by that same deadline. According to the media release, “Veolia will work with Unilever to implement used packaging collection solutions, add recycling capacity and develop new processes and business models through this partnership in various countries.” ​The partnership will begin with material collection projects in India and Indonesia. From there, presumably, the companies will build on their learnings and expand collection and recycling efforts accordingly. “The scale of the plastic waste issue is getting worse, not better, with the production of plastics expected to double over the next two decades,” ​acknowledges Marc Engel, Unilever’s chief supply chain officer. “We all have a lot more to do to address this critical issue and we hope that by partnering with Veolia, a world leader in waste management, we can take meaningful strides towards a circular economy.”
Read the full article at: www.cosmeticsdesign.com